Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Make a return to old-time Ketchum

‘Poets and Pickers’ will run Saturday and Sunday


By AMY BUSEK
Express Staff Writer

    David Barovetto is a local architect and resident of the valley since 1970, and he’s ready to up the ante this year at Wagon Days with a tribute to Ketchum’s colorful Western past.
    “We’re getting back to the period when wagons were rolling and fiddlers were strolling,” Barovetto said.
    “Poets and Pickers” is a nod to Ketchum’s stint as a wild Western mining town in the 1800s, Barovetto said. Ten local restaurants and bars chipped in for the cost and, in exchange, the poets and musicians will be dipping in and out of the establishments throughout the day on Friday and Saturday. The city also contributed funds to pay the poets and musicians, Barovetto said.
    After roaming all day, the acoustic guitar players will end up at the Ore Wagon Museum for an old-fashioned hootenanny, Barovetto said.
    “We’re going to party like we did in the 1800s,” he said.
    Cowboy poets will be spinning yarn at the Ore Wagon Museum on Friday and Saturday afternoon, “keeping alive those old Western attitudes,” according to Barovetto. The poets performed during last year’s Wagon Days, Barovetto said, and it was a rousing success.
    Bryan Dilworth, cowboy poet and ranch owner, is in charge of the poet half of “Poets and Pickers,” and Matt Renner, member of local band Slow Children Playing, is organizing the musicians.
    All of the performing poets and musicians are local to the Wood River Valley, Barovetto said, in preserving the down-home feel of the event.  
    Barovetto said the event is a way to both increase the festive environment of Wagon Days and get tourists to stay in town after the parade ends. He said Ketchum’s wild and woolly vibe in the 1800s got lost in the glamorous Hollywood reputation that came with the advent of skiing and the resort at the start of the 20th century.
    “We’re proud of our Western history,” he said.




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