Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Briefs


Health office to be closed Friday

South Central Public Health District offices in Bellevue, Burley, Gooding and Jerome will be closed Friday, Oct. 19, for an all-staff training day. The Twin Falls office will be closed from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Regular business hours will resume on Monday.

For more information, contact Amy Lierman at 737-5978 or visit www.phd5.idaho.gov.

 

Work out to help Hospice

Buy a one-day or weekend pass to Zenergy Health Club and Spa this Saturday or Sunday, Oct. 20-21, and help raise money for the valley’s only Hospice & Palliative Care of the Wood River Valley. 

For $15 or $25, guests can use the indoor and outdoor saline pools, gym, squash court and a full class schedule.

For more information, call 725-0595.

 

Children’s obesity program to begin

In an effort to reduce obesity among local children, St. Luke’s Wood River is offering the YEAH program, an acronym for Youth Engaged in Activities for Health. It is for children ages 5-16 with a body mass index greater than 85 percent who have been referred by their physician for weight and lifestyle management. 

The program focuses on healthy eating, physical activity and behavior changes.

According to St. Luke’s, the program has shown tremendous results because it engages the entire family in a lifestyle modification effort.

To find out more about the admission requirements or to enroll, call St. Luke’s Center for Community Health at 727-8733. 

 

Hailey Kiwanis installs officers

At the last meeting for the Kiwanis Club of Hailey and the Wood River Valley, Jim Spinelli, governor elect for the Utah/Idaho District, installed the officers for 2012-13.

President is Kim Baker of Professional Roofing; president elect is Karen McNary, manager of Mountain West Bank in Ketchum; vice president is Bob Wiederrick of Wiederrick’s Custom Metal Works & Fire Screens; secretary is Dale Ewersen of Splash & Dash; and treasurer is Heather Parton, vice president and manager of Hailey branch of Mountain West Bank.

Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to “changing the world, one child and one community at a time.”  For more information, call 721-7246.

 

Shooter drill planned for St. Luke’s

The Blaine County Emergency Management team will sponsor an exercise involving a shooting scenario in the emergency room at St. Luke’s Wood River on Thursday, Oct. 25, from 3-6 p.m.

Multiple county and emergency response agencies will participate. Local law enforcement will be on scene with unloaded weapons conducting a safety sweep per their protocol if such an event were to actually occur.  Each weapon will be visibly marked to verify that it has passed a safety check and is unloaded.  

Numerous emergency vehicles and equipment will be staged at the north parking lot starting at 2 p.m.  Barricades and tape will be used to identify this area.  People visiting the hospital are asked to avoid this area. 

All roads in the area will remain open during the training. 

 

Business Showcase set for Sun Valley

The 20th annual Business Showcase is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 15, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Limelight Room at the Sun Valley Inn. The event, sponsored by Zions Bank and Sun Valley Co., is free and open to the public.

Businesses that would like to reserve booth space should contact Jeffra Syms or Mary Sfingi at Zions Bank at 726-3007 by Monday, Oct. 29.

“We’re excited to celebrate two decades of bringing together the best and brightest of the Wood River Valley’s business community,” said Bryan Furlong, Zions Bank’s area president. 

 

Open house set at BCRD FitWorks

BCRD FitWorks is hosting a Welcome Week with free fitness classes from Oct. 22-26 to celebrate the second anniversary of the opening of the public fitness facility in Hailey.

In 2010, the Blaine County Recreation District renovated the old locker rooms at the former Wood River High School (now the Community Campus in Hailey) into a full-service fitness facility. FitWorks offers cardio and strength training opportunities as well as 32 classes each week including yoga, Pilates, Boot Camp, spinning, Zumba, body sculpt, weight circuit training and T’ai Chi. 

Wednesday, Oct. 26, will be the highlight of the week with healthy refreshments offered all day. For more information and a class schedule, visit www.bcrd.org or call 578-2273.

 

National Guard helps with Mustang Complex fire

The Idaho National Guard helped the Salmon-Challis National Forest with management of the Mustang Complex fire, north of the Salmon River, from Sept. 1 to Oct. 3.  According to a news release from the Forest Service, the Guard’s primary mission was to staff traffic control points due to road closures.

As many as 121 Idaho National Guard members were assigned to the fire, working 20 traffic control points, with an additional 15 Guardsmen working the Joint Task Force in Boise.  

“Without the assistance of the Idaho National Guard, ensuring public safety would have proved difficult,”  said forest Supervisor Frank Guzman. 

Guzman provided Certificates of Appreciation and Salmon-Challis National Forest belt buckles to the troops who had helped.  The Idaho National Guard in turn presented the national forest with a signed photo of North Fork, Idaho, taken in 2011.  

 

New boat ramp on Middle Fork

A new boat ramp has been built at the Indian Creek put-in on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River.

According to a news release from the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation, the previous ramp, built in 2006, fell victim to exposure and wood rot after supporting countless rafts on the 75-foot descent from the public airstrip to the river. Rebar and broken sill logs signaled the time for a new ramp, and the Forest Service asked the foundation to lead the project. 

More than 10,000 people float the Middle Fork each year. Many fly into Indian Creek and use the boat ramp to launch at low water.

The foundation recruited 10 volunteers from Idaho, Montana and Colorado to replace the ramp. No power tools or mechanical devices were used during the project. 

 




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