Friday, August 12, 2005

Board adjusts activity pass downward

Goes from $100 down to $75


By JEFF CORDES
Express Staff Writer

As it turned out, $100 for a season pass was too much to watch high school sports.

The Blaine County School District Board of Trustees felt that Wood River High School's proposed $100 cost for a season activity pass was too pricey.

So, on Tuesday night at its regular monthly meeting, the board adjusted the cost downward. But the season passes will still cost more than before.

Last year, you paid $20 as a middle school student, $45 for an individual pass and $75 for a couples pass to attend all Wood River athletic events.

In light of reduced revenue from corporate sponsorships to help fund its athletic department, the high school proposed substantial increases for the 2005-06 school year and sent the proposals to the school board.

The proposed prices had been $40 for middle school students, $100 for individuals and $160 for couples, athletic director Ron Martinez said.

That was too high, the board felt and acted accordingly.

Tuesday night, board members approved the following rate schedule: $35 for middle school students, $75 for individuals and $100 for couples.

School board vice chairman Kim Nilsen also asked the high school to consider implementing an additional family season pass in the future.

General admission ticket prices remain $5 for adults.

The 2005-06 athletic season begins Friday, Aug. 26 when the Wood River High School varsity football team hosts the Filer Wildcats at 7 p.m. at Phil Homer Field in Hailey.

Season passes are now on sale at the high school.




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