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For the week of December 20 through 26, 2000

Second wolf shot near Fairfield


"What the killers don't realize, or don't care about, is that they are undermining the hard work of ranchers, conservationists and others on gray wolf recovery, pushing off further any chance of removing the strict protections for wolves under the Endangered Species Act. 

- Suzanne Laverty, Defenders of Wildlife Northwest representative.


A second wolf has been found shot to death in the mountains north of Fairfield.

B-96, the alpha male from the Smoky Mountain pack, was recovered on Dec. 4 near Lick Creek in Camas County. The Nez Perce Tribe's aerial monitoring efforts indicated the wolf was last seen on Nov. 22. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confirmed B-96 was shot.

Another male, B-57, was found dead on Nov. 23, about 10 miles from the location of B-96ís discoverry. That 3-year-old male had dispersed from the Thunder Mountain pack near McCall and recently joined the Smoky Mountain pack.

"We have received several excellent leads and many calls regarding the death of B-57, and we will aggressively pursue our investigation of the death of B-96 as well," special agent Paul Weyland said.

"If wolves continue to be injured or killed, Idaho will not reach its recovery goal, which means wolves will remain an endangered species for a longer time."

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has offered a $2,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the killing, and the Defenders of Wildlife group has chipped in another $2,000 to the reward.

"What the killers don't realize, or don't care about, is that they are undermining the hard work of ranchers, conservationists and others on gray wolf recovery, pushing off further any chance of removing the strict protections for wolves under the Endangered Species Act," said Suzanne Laverty, Defenders Northwest representative.

The killing of an animal protected under the Endangered Species Act is punishable by a fine of up to $100,000 and one year in jail. Fish and Wildlife asks anyone who noticed suspicious behavior in the area between Nov. 7 and Dec. 2 to call (208) 378-5333.

 

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